New books to recommend

Yesterday I attended the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association conference and got to sit in on some very interesting workshops. I also eagerly wrote down recommendations from the region’s booksellers on some of the top reads they are recommending to customers these days.

I concentrated on books for middle grade readers and young adults, since the books presented there cover all genres and all age groups. Among the highlights? Here are the new ones I’m putting on my list after hearing what the speakers had to say:

When You Reach Me

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead was billed as a “perfect book” and great to read aloud. It was named an Amazon best of the month for July this year. Here’s what Amazon’s reviewer had to say: Shortly after sixth-grader Miranda and her best friend Sal part ways, for some inexplicable reason her once familiar world turns upside down. Maybe it’s because she’s caught up in reading A Wrinkle in Time and trying to understand time travel, or perhaps it’s because she’s been receiving mysterious notes which accurately predict the future. Rebecca Stead’s poignant novel, When You Reach Me, captures the interior monologue and observations of kids who are starting to recognize and negotiate the complexities of friendship and family, class and identity. Set in New York City in 1979, the story takes its cue from beloved Manhattan tales for middle graders like E.L. Konigsburg’s From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, Louise Fitzhugh’s Harriet the Spy, and Norma Klein’s Mom the Wolfman and Me. Like those earlier novels, When You Reach Me will stir the imaginations of young readers curious about day-to-day life in a big city. –Lauren Nemroff Recommended for ages 10 and up.

Evolution of Calpurnia Tate

The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly was recommended as a great “slice of life story, very original.” Booklist gave this a starred review. Here’s what they had to say: Growing up with six brothers in rural Texas in 1899, 12-year-old Callie realizes that her aversion to needlework and cooking disappoints her mother. Still, she prefers to spend her time exploring the river, observing animals, and keeping notes on what she sees. Callie’s growing interest in nature creates a bond with her previously distant grandfather, an amateur naturalist of some distinction. After they discover an unknown species of vetch, he attempts to have it officially recognized. This process creates a dramatic focus for the novel, though really the main story here is Callie’s gradual self-discovery as revealed in her vivid first-person narrative. By the end, she is equally aware of her growing desire to become a scientist and of societal expectations that make her dream seem nearly impossible. Interwoven with the scientific theme are threads of daily life in a large family—the bonds with siblings, the conversations overheard, the unspoken understandings and misunderstandings—all told with wry humor and a sharp eye for details that bring the characters and the setting to life. The eye-catching jacket art, which silhouettes Callie and images from nature against a yellow background, is true to the period and the story. Many readers will hope for a sequel to this engaging, satisfying first novel. Grades 4-7. –Carolyn Phelan

Mountain Meets the Moon

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin was recommended as a good cross-generational read-aloud book. This also got a starred review from Booklist. Here’s the review: In this enchanted and enchanting adventure, Minli, whose name means “quick thinking,” lives with her desperately poor parents at the confluence of Fruitless Mountain and the Jade River. While her mother worries and complains about their lot, her father brightens their evenings with storytelling. One day, after a goldfish salesman promises that his wares will bring good luck, Minli spends one of her only two coins in an effort to help her family. After her mother ridicules what she believes to be a foolish purchase, Minli sets out to find the Old Man of the Moon, who, it is told, may impart the true secret to good fortune. Along the way, she finds excitement, danger, humor, magic, and wisdom, and she befriends a flightless dragon, a talking fish, and other companions and helpmates in her quest. With beautiful language, Lin creates a strong, memorable heroine and a mystical land. Stories, drawn from a rich history of Chinese folktales, weave throughout her narrative, deepening the sense of both the characters and the setting and smoothly furthering the plot. Children will embrace this accessible, timeless story about the evil of greed and the joy of gratitude. Lin’s own full-color drawings open each chapter. Grades 3-6. –Andrew Medlar

I’m going back to the conference this afternoon, so I hope to have more recommendations afterward.

One Response to New books to recommend

  1. Emily says:

    Intrigued by “When You Reach Me”. Thanks!

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